Guide: What Is Schizophrenia?

In explaining schizophrenia, we are going to start with the incorrect definition of shizophrenia provided by the American Psychiatric Association at https://www.psychiatry.org/patients-families/schizophrenia/what-is-schizophrenia:

Schizophrenia is a chronic brain disorder that affects less than one percent of the U.S. population. When schizophrenia is active, symptoms can include delusions, hallucinations, trouble with thinking and concentration, and lack of motivation. However, with treatment, most symptoms of schizophrenia will greatly improve.

First, note that the APA (American Psychiatric Association) does not provide a definition.  Instead, they list a set of experiences that they merely claim define a disease.  Let us look at these experiences.  First, delusions.  Well, delusions are not a definitive (guaranteed) indicator of any mental illness; for example, a person can have a beneficial delusion like the delusion that most parents impose on their children regarding Santa Claus.  In fact, human nature is, in part, based on what are called “fictions.”  Fictions are, in effect, beneficial delusions.  More about that in a future article.  The same is true of hallucinations, trouble with thinking and concentration, and lack of motivation.

So, what then is schizophrenia?  Schizophrenia, very simply, is a form of dementia.  What is dementia?  Dementia is a group of psycho-internally (that is, within a person) unstoppable, (by the person with the symptoms) thinking and social symptoms that interferes with daily functioning.  Note that if the symptoms are not psycho-internally (that is, within a person) unstoppable (by the person with the symptoms) then the person is NOT suffering from dementia and, therefore, cannot be suffering from shizophrenia.